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Adolescence is a tumultuous time with a myriad of physical, emotional and developmental changes. A teenager goes through a sea of changes at this time. As a parent, you have to understand your teen and help him or her go through this difficult phase. One of the most difficult discussions at this time is sex education. It is not only complicated but requires skills on the part of you, as a parent so that your teen feels comfortable enough to have this discussion with you. Getting your teen to talk about sex is not going to be easy.

Establish an honest relationship. After you have an initial discussion about sex, it's important not to just let the issue drop. Make sure to keep the lines of communication open. ck in with your teen frequently to see how they are handling sexual activity. You can say, "How are things going with Bill?

  Unfortunately, most teens have different views than their parents when it comes to what constitutes a sex talk. About 90 of parents nationwide say they've spoken to their teens about sex   Make it clear that you will be there to listen and to offer advice, if necessary. Your entire relationship doesn't have to-and shouldn't-revolve around your teen's sex life. Remember to have other conversations, too. Don't forget to say things like, "Tell me how your art project is coming along." Or you could ask about platonic friends. Have fun with your teen. Don't let sex alter your 77(64)   Here's a piece of advice that might sound like something your mom might tell you, but it is a great piece of advice for teenage girls that I kept near and dear to my heart. In high school, I was tempted by so many things, yet, somehow, deep inside, my own personality just didn't desire those things and even though I was the oddball, I never gave into things I knew weren't right. Trust me, as /5(22)

Are you having fun together? Make it clear that you will be there to listen and to offer advice, if necessary.

Your entire relationship doesn't have to-and shouldn't-revolve around your teen's sex life. Remember to have other conversations, too. Don't forget to say things like, "Tell me how your art project is coming along. Have fun with your teen.

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Don't let sex alter your relationship. Continue to do the things you enjoy, such as cooking or watching a ballgame together. Begin the conversation early.

Sex and Dating Advice For TEENAGERS (Guys AND Girls) - Keeping It REAL

Don't wait until your teen is sexually active to begin talking about sex. Start the conversation when your child is younger.

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The specific age is up to you, but many parents start talking to their children about sex towards the end of elementary school. This way your child won't be confused by rumors being spread on the playground. Establish early on that you are open to talking about sex. That way, when your teen becomes sexually active, you will already have established some rapport. You can also explain your sexual values to your child.

Help them to understand the emotional implications of sex, in addition to the physical components. Method 2 of Educate your teen. One of the most important things you can do is to help your teen be responsible about sex.

Even if you don't agree with the choice to have sex, you still want to make sure that your teen is safe. Help by providing informational resources. You can explain to your teen the importance of being with a partner who cares about and respects you.

You can also use science to educate your teen. Provide information about sexually transmitted diseases and how they are passed between partners. Explain that intercourse is not the only form of sex. Make sure your teen understands that you can contract STDs from oral sex, too. Organizations such as Planned Parenthood offer a lot of information about sex in general, and teen sex in particular.

Contact them to get some very helpful brochures.

Explain consequences. Try to convey to your teen the gravity of having a sexual relationship.

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Make it clear that there may be physical consequences. For example, sex can result in an accidental pregnancy.

Ask your child how they plan to prevent negative physical consequences. Make sure to address emotional consequences, too. Explain that there is a different level of emotional intimacy between two people who are having sex. Talk to your teen about protecting their feelings. Do they know how to express their emotional needs? Provide birth control. Make sure that your teen has access to birth control. If you provide it, you can be sure that they have a safe method. Even if you don't agree with the choice to have sex, you can still help to make sure that your teen is safe.

Anyone who is sexually active, male or female, should have access to their own condoms. You don't want your teen to have to rely on someone else to bring the protection.

Empower your teen to protect his or her own body. If you have a daughter, take her to the doctor to get prescription birth control. A doctor can help you and your teen decide whether the pill or a different type of hormone therapy will work for her.

Support healthy relationships. Encourage your teen to only have sex with someone they trust. Explain what a healthy relationship is.

For example, it includes trust, kindness, and respect.

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You can say things like, "It seems like Mary is making you happy, and I'm glad. You can say something like, "I'm concerned that Tim's behavior is controlling.

Here are 7 common reasons teens choose to have sex and some suggestions for how you can respond to them: 1. "I'll feel more grown up." As they physically mature and have more and more independence, some teens feel they're ready for sex and that having it   Parents influence their kids' attitudes about sex and relationships more than they realize. It's a myth that all teens want to avoid talking to their parents about sex and dating. In fact, many Author: Jessica Wakeman

Does it feel that way to you? Set boundaries.

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Just because you talk about sex with your teen does not mean that you are no longer in charge of your household. When you give your teen boundaries, you are actually providing another type of resource. Boundaries help your teen learn responsibility and respect.

For example, you can make it clear that your teen is not allowed to have sex in your house. You should feel free to keep enforcing curfew. Just because your teen is sexually active, that does not make him or her an adult who can do what they choose.

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Explain to your teen that while they are choosing to engage in adult behavior, they are still your child and must follow certain rules while living at home. Discuss your values. Let your teen know where your family values lie. Have an open discussion about your feelings on intimacy.

This will provide your teen with an additional frame of reference. It is important to think about your actions before following through. Many people to do not believe in sex before marriage, for example. Let your teen know that your values are important to you. But that you are willing to listen to his or her values, too.

Method of Find information for yourself. It can be overwhelming to deal with your sexually active teen. You might be emotional. You might also not be sure what information to provide.

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That's normal. Take some time to find information that can be useful to both you and your teen. If you have a trusted doctor, that's a great place to start.

Ask your doctor for information to give to your teen about STDs, pregnancy, etc. You can also ask for information for parents on how to cope with this change.

Organizations like Planned Parenthood also have great resources. Ask if they have materials on helping parents deal with this emotional time.

Help your teen find people to trust. It is important that your teen feels like you can be trusted.

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However, it can also be very helpful to help your teen find other sources of support. It is always comforting to have more than one person to turn to. Ask your teen's other parent to become involved. Make it clear that your teen would appreciate an additional resource. Other family members can also be a great source of support. If your teen has a favorite aunt, encourage her to talk openly to your teen.

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Offer to take your teen to talk to a doctor. It can be useful to speak to someone who can be completely objective. Monitor your emotions. Your major concern at this time is likely how your teen is handling sex. But it is important to also remember to take care of yourself.

Many parents go through a tough emotional period when they find out their teen is having sex.

Many parents aren't ready for their kids to grow up, and feel a little sad and anxious when they become sexually active. It's ok to feel emotional. Try to find a support system for yourself. Talk to your partner. Or ask your best friend for a shoulder to lean on.

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Try to remember to keep living your life. Your teen's sex life doesn't have to become the center of your world. Ask for professional advice. Hunter Handsfield, MD, a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Washington and a nationally recognized STD expert who has helped develop HIV testing guidelines for the CDC.

Fact: Women can have gonorrhea, chlamydia, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis without having any obvious symptoms. Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted bacterial infection that usually starts out with no symptoms but it is very destructive in the long term, especially to women's reproductive systems.

Additional advice: Jeanne Marrazzo, MD, an STD specialist at the University of Washington medical school, advises annual chlamydia tests for younger women. Since chlamydia can be detected with a simple urine test now, a full pelvic exam isn't necessary. You can also request a gonorrhea test at the same time, if you are concerned that you may have been exposed.

  Adolescence is a tumultuous time with a myriad of physical, emotional and developmental changes. A teenager goes through a sea of changes at this time. As a parent, you have to understand your teen and help him or her go through this difficult phase. One of the most difficult discussions at this time is sex education   The best sex tips ever from Cosmopolitan. Here's your guide to over 50 yrs worth of our best sex advice   While many teenagers will scoff at any advice you might try to give them, some of it will stick in their minds, so think about imparting some of the above on those present in your life. This page contains affiliate links. I receive a commission if you choose to purchase anything after clicking on them. By a conscious rethink - Last ated on 9th June You may also like 5 Things They

Talking point: If you're a sexually active adult, you've probably contracted several of the different types of the human papillomavirus HPV out there-more than 0 of which are sexually transmitted-and you probably had no idea. Fact: HPV is the number-one cause of cervical cancer and genital warts.

Additional advice: To screen for possibly HPV-caused, potentially precancerous abnormalities in the cells of the cervix, all women should get annual Pap smears. Women under 26 should also consider getting the HPV vaccinationsays Dr.

Fact: The Pill is so safe and effective these days that it is available over-the-counter in some countries.

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Depending on the formula of the medication, the Pill can:. Additional advice: Though safer than ever, the Pill still has minor side effects, such as breast tenderness, headas, and nausea, but they often subside after a few months.

But rare, serious side effects include blood clots, heart attack, and stroke. Home vron Right Sex vron Right 6 Things Your Teen Needs to Know About Sex. ated November 06, Save Pin FB ellipsis More. Tweet Mail Email iphone Send Text Message Print. Talking point: The Pill does more than prevent pregnancy. Help reduce menstrual bleeding for women at risk of anemia Reduce painful periods Cut back on the risk of uterine infection and ovarian cancer Treat PMS mood swings Help clear up mild to moderate acne.



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